Humanitarian

Through her role, Elizabeth was able to help the communities access services from the government such as water, electricity, and livelihoods. Her most unforgettable humanitarian response is the all-out-war that happened in Mindanao in 2000, where she saw hope beyond the harsh realities of war.
With or without emergencies, Noraida Abo seldom stays at the office of the United Youth of the Philippines-Women (UnYPhil-Women), a local women’s rights organization she currently heads in the southern region of the Philippines. She prefers the outdoors where she experiences first hand the complex...
With or without emergencies, Noraida Abo seldom stays at the office of the United Youth of the Philippines-Women (UnYPhil-Women), a local women’s rights organization she currently heads in the southern region of the Philippines. She prefers the outdoors where she experiences first hand the complex...
"There are a lot of innovations now about how you can provide better aid like digital cash programming, and the likes. The needs and context are ever evolving but one must never forget the very essence of humanitarian work – to uphold people’s dignity, especially women. Whatever you do, when you do...
Humanitarian workers are regularly confronted by difficult choices. What humanitarian worker worth his or her salt has not been confronted by the possibility of either doing harm or doing nothing; or was stuck in a situation where good intentions are not enough in the face of bad or worse options?...
An evacuation center in Lanao del Norte
For 10 years, Sowaib and his wife ran an eatery in the transport terminal in barangay Lilod Madaya in Marawi City. When the war erupted, he was mistaken for a member of the Maute group and was shot in the arm. Now, living in an evacuation center, Sowaib finds a way to cope and carve a future for...
Ahmed walks in a tent city
Ahmed is seven. His father Zaldy said the boy is fond of lamps that each night in their house in barangay Lilod, Marawi City, Ahmed always wanted the LED lights turned off so he can have the soft glow of the lamp when he does his homework or read something before he sleeps.
Mrs. Bairona Langco, 44, from Marawi City
On the day of the siege on May 23, she opened her boutique that sells bags and dresses like it was an ordinary day. But in the afternoon, there was an alarm call. People were running in the streets yelling, “ISIS! ISIS!”
Nashreema, 18, with her son Jomal
Nashreema is a young mother who fled Marawi City. Before the conflict, Nashreema owned a small shop where she sold vegetables, fish and snacks, while her husband drives a tricycle around their small town inside Marawi City. When the war broke out, Nashreema fled empty-handed.
A woman sets up a small shop inside Saguiaran evacuation center
The ongoing debate about cash assistance versus direct food distribution often overlooks the needs of individuals and families that we in HRC are trying to help. Cash provides the family the ability to meet its most critical needs. It may be milk or the variety and freshness of other food that the...

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