Who we are

Women farmers carrying on their heads newly-harvested palay (Photo: Veejay Villafranca/Oxfam)

The Philippines is a country where 17 million people live below the poverty line. It has persistent high levels of inequality and vulnerability. Further, it is one of the most highly at-risk countries from disasters, with pockets of fragility that threaten its stability and development. However, the Philippines is also classified as a lower middle-income country. The country’s recent macro-economic performance has been strong, and the government has made clear commitments with respect to poverty reduction. While these developments are positive, inequality is growing and poverty remains persistent. 

Our History

Oxfam is an international confederation of 18 organisations networked together in more than 94 countries, as part of a global movement for change, to build a future free from the injustice of poverty. The name “Oxfam” comes from the Oxford Committee for Famine Relief, founded in Britain in 1942. The group campaigned for food supplies to be sent through an allied naval blockade to starving women and children in enemy-occupied Greece during the Second World War. Since then, as well as becoming a world leader in the delivery of emergency relief, Oxfam implements long-term development programs in vulnerable communities. We support the campaigns of civil society to fix the global food system, end unfair trade rules, and to combat climate change.

Oxfam in the Philippines

Oxfam’s vision is a just world without poverty: a world in which people can influence decisions that affect their lives, enjoy their rights, and assume their responsibilities as full citizens of a world in which all human beings are valued and treated equally.

Oxfam sa Pilipinas has been working in the country for over 25 years. In the Philippines, our goal is to contribute to the eradication of poverty by supporting women and other vulnerable groups in saving lives and building livelihoods, enhancing their resilience to crises, shocks and stresses, and making their voices heard to hold duty-bearers accountable.