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How are remote towns doing two months into the Marawi crisis?
image story marawi city evacuees
People who fled their homes in Marawi City tell their stories.
The Humanitarian Response Consortium (HRC), an Oxfam partner, conducted a rapid assessment of the impact of Typhoon Nina in Catanduanes, and responded to immediate needs on water, sanitation and hygiene in villages with high cases of diarrhoea. More than a week after the storm, the HRC’s...
The board of the People’s Survival Fund (PSF), a special annual fund in the National Treasury intended to finance local climate change adaptation initiatives, gives the green light for two projects in Mindanao...
On October 19, super typhoon Haima or Lawin as it is locally known, struck the Philippines, leaving a trail of destroyed houses and buildings, as well as damaged lowland and upland agricultural lands in its path. Many communities affected in northern Luzon are still reeling from the effects of the...
Seaweed Farmers in Sitio Converse dry their harvests in the open under the sun. (Photo: Maria Carolina Bello/Oxfam)
The seaweeds enterprise project in Sitio converse, Barangay Ngolos is Oxfams very first communitylevel partnership with a people's organization in the municipality of Guiuan. Copyright by Maria Carolina Bello/Oxfam...
Christoper ‘Toper’ Cabalhiw (right), a local volunteer working with Oxfam as a Public Health Promoter, organising a relay hand washing race between two teams of children. Oxfam public health promotion activity aimed at encouraging children to understand why and how to wash their hands and use the latrines.(Photo:Jane Beesley/Oxfam)
Oxfam is one of the lead agencies working to ensure people have safe water, hygiene and sanitation facilities (WASH work) following typhoon Haiyan. Within the first three months of Oxfam’s response, over 200,000 people have been provided with clean water and over 8,500 people have received...
Mary Ann (10) and Mary Grace (14) stand in front of Anibong Bay in Tacloban.(Photo:Eleanor Farmer/Oxfam)
Residents in Tacloban were invited to take a self-portrait or 'selfie' with an iphone. We want to promote Oxfam’s life-saving work in the Philippines post Typhoon Haiyan and to show the continued need for support via our social media channels. The Selfie is an instant visual...
Photographs taken alongside CEO Mark Goldring's visit to Tacloban.(Photo: Caroline Gluck/Oxfam)
Fishing families who lived in the path of typhoon Yolanda have lost boats, nets, and tools; the essentials they need to produce food and earn a living. Coral reefs have also been badly affected by the storm. Oxfam is working with fishing communities to rebuild boats and repair nets. Boat repair...
Leo Olobia (49) Fogging Machine Operator. (Photo: Eleanor Farmer/Oxfam)
One of the greatest threats of infectious disease post-Haiyan currently comes from dengue. Rainfall has collected in old containers, tyres, and piles of debris, creating a perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes. Oxfam is helping to prevent an outbreak by working with the Department of Health (DOH)...

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